Running Websites With WordPress?

Aside from my work in the blogging world, I sometimes accept web development work on the side, such as the Parish website I recently helped launch, in collaboration with a designer colleague. I’ve also helped out my daughter’s preschool in running their own site and email system. And there have been a few organizations I’ve lent a hand to in this matter.

In all of these cases, the common denominator is the use of WordPress as the content management system. I’m sure there’s not much need to explain why. Being used to running WordPress on an entire blog/new media network, it’s almost like second nature to me. So preparing the hosting account, installing the software, uploading themes and plugins, and actually setting up and maintaining a site running WordPress is something that I’m very much comfortable with. Actually it can be a no-brainer with the easy install scripts (i.e., Fantastico) that come with most hosting packages. A few clicks and a few lines of typed-in information and you’re good to go with a basic install.

I tend to think that others share this sentiment with me. A quick Google search for “inurl:wp-login.php” will yield all indexed sites running WordPress, and some of these will not actually be in blog format, but instead websites and e-zines belonging to companies and organizations. A search for “site:.gov inurl:wp-login.php”, for instance, will show you that a number of US government organizations and local governemnt units running WP on their official websites.

Another observation of mine is that WordPress theme designers are coming up with themes and theme packages aimed at users who want to run a WordPress-powered site that is not necessarily in a blog format. For instance, there’s the Revolution Theme and WP Remix. Then there are those for users who intend to run magazine-like themes like Premium News and Zine Style. (Disclosure: WP Remix and Premium News are advertisers on the Blog Herald.)

So there is a market for WP themes not aimed at the blogging community, but rather for other entities such as corporations or businesses, or perhaps people running traditional publications. This only goes to show that easy-to use back-end software goes a long way. If there are others using WordPress for non-blogging purposes, I’d love to hear how you do it!

Comments

  1. says

    I find myself repeatedly surprised when I see WordPress being used for a site I had no idea it was being used for. A recent example is when the company I work for was asked to redesign the website of a major UK university, and we found it was all produced in WordPress (albeit not particularly well).

  2. says

    It’d work for websites that don’t require much pizzazz, but for anything more than that you’d be much better off using a regular CMS or getting a custom one made.

  3. says

    I think that the average wordpress.com blogger would be surprised what people are doing with WP.

    LJUrban is using WP with a custom theme and some added bits.

    I would have to say that between Plugins, Sidebar registration, & Widgets you can build a WP site that allows its user to do just about anything.

    If i could give the WP development team a big high five for what they’ve done, I would.

  4. says

    The web design and development team I’m working with, sees WordPress a fear solutions for most of its clients. Along with the rich WP plug-ins “directory” it is great.

  5. says

    I’ve only been designing for a few years, but I have found WP to be a fantastic CMS once I can get in and create a theme and manipulate it for a client’s site. I have a pretty simple process:

    1) Figure out the site architecture the client wants
    2) Make some comps for the design for approval
    3) Create a custom WP theme with all template files and CSS
    4) Drop the images and files into the client’s directories
    5) Tweak templates and files with conditional tags if needed
    6) Add the final icing on the cake for branding, a custom login using Binary Moon’s custom login plugin
    7) Finish and feel great about the client having an easy way to manage their site!

  6. says

    I discovered WordPress two years ago and now I use it as CMS for all websites I’m doing for my clients. I didn’t know about the custom login plugin, I just modified the original wp-login file to do what I needed.

  7. says

    I’ve recently started using WordPress for site building as well. I just finished http://www.progpowerusa.com recently. I actually had a guy email me once he discovered (in the URL structure) that I was using WordPress. To me, that told me it didn’t have so much that “blog” feel and I accomplished what I intended with that.

    I have a few more I am building now as well, learn something new every day to do with it!

  8. says

    I´m using wordpress for some easy websites, too. It is one of the easiest to learn for customers, no complicated Backend and Basic functions. But I´m not sure about the security risks, WP is not known to be the safest CMS…

    very intereesting post

    Falko

  9. tina says

    An easy-to-use and tweak theme based on the blue sky background image. Two columns, widget-ready, gravatar-ready, and SEO friendly, brought to you by The English Guy.
    :)

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