August 28, 2008

Halloween Costume Blogs Begin to Launch

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With Labor Day right around the corner here in the States, there’s not much to look forward to in the way of holidays after the summer ends. We might not get the day off, but there’s always Halloween!

With approximately one-third of all adults dressing up, and virtually all kids, it’s time to start scouting out that perfect costume. Characters that appear to be popular for 2008:

The Joker from The Dark Knight
Transformers’ Optimus Prime
High School Musical’s Gabriella
Indiana Jones
Hannah Montana

If you’re searching for yourself, your kids or a friend, be sure to check out the Halloween Costume Shopping Blog. FYI: The blog is run by a company that sells costumes, 0ver 5,000 of them!

From sexy to funny, the blog will profile different costumes all the way to October 31, 2008.

It might be early to think about carving pumpkins and collecting candy, but with the summer about to end, we need something to hold on to! Plus, word on the street is that Joker costumes are already selling out. Y so serious!?

Another neat Halloween costume blog: Costumzee

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Who Would You Like to Meet at a Blog Conference?

I’m going to be at Blog World Expo in Las Vegas on September 20-21, 2008, and so is David Peralty, who listed “Some People I Hope to Meet at Blog World Expo.”

The list of Exhibitors and Speakers at Blog World Expo this year is incredible. A veritable list of whose who.

His list of people he’d like to meet got me thinking about my list. And then I started thinking about all the conferences I attend and speak at every year and all the fantastic people I meet, some famous and some not, who change my life in those few minutes of meet and greet.

I love blog and web conferences. I learn so much. While many think that I am there to be the educator, I enjoy them because of the lessons I learn from fellow speakers, but most of all from fellow attendees. Those quickly caught moments in corridors, exhibition halls, at my book table, or even in the restroom. Those are where the real business of a conference really happens. Those quick moments of connections made that last long after the conference. read more

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Blogger Arrested Accused of Leaking Guns n’ Roses Songs

Kevin Cogill, probably more known as Skwerl over at music blog Antiquiet, where he leaked 9 Guns n’ Roses songs from the upcoming album Chinese Democracy, was arrested by the FBI this morning. According to the blog, the FBI picked him up early, and Antiquiet had decided not to make a big deal about it, that is, until LA Times picked it up. That sparked the follow-up post where we learn that Kevin was released at a $10,000 bail, and that the preliminary hearing has been scheduled for September 17, at 4:30 PM. read more

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Jaiku is Back, Not in Google Apps Engine

Jaiku has found its way back online, now hosted at the Google datacenters, but not within the Google Apps Engine as was rumored. From the official blog post:

We’ve now moved Jaiku to a Google data center. This is something that we’d planned to do anyway, as part of our future transition to Google App Engine.

Jaiku is still running its original engine, however, there are some news, like a new TOS and unlimited invites. I didn’t know they were scarce?

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August 27, 2008

My Experience Installing Disqus 2.0.1

I’ve been using Disqus on my WordPress blog for a few months now, and just installed their new version 2.0.1. I thought I’d run down the installation experience and some of the new features for those curious about Disqus. read more

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TechCrunch Forgets Green; Goes White Instead

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It’s not every day that a blog that writes about blogs gets written up on a blog writing about blogs. Such is the case right here, right now, when it comes to the TechCrunch redesign.

The gang over TC, who obsessively profile and review new Internet products and companies, have cleaned up their image with a new look. As with most redesigns, the spin is to improve navigation and increase ‘readability.’ However, only a fool would look past the real reason: to sell advertising. And you can’t really fault a business (yes, it’s a blog – but it’s big business) for optimizing ad space.

I’m undecided on the new design. Quite honestly, I need to give myself a few days to adapt before I can share my thoughts. My initial reaction is that it’s almost TOO ‘clean.’ I understand the power of white space, but the site’s header is so bare, that a new reader might have no clue what a tremendous force TC is.

Google and Apple have made white en vogue, but I’m not sold. There’s a fine line between ‘clean and simple’ and just looking like you were too lazy to hire a talented designer.

I’m on the fence with the new TechCrunch look. What do you think?

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WordPress Wednesday News: WordCamp South Africa, World of WordCamps, Blaming WordPress, and Crazyhorse Gallops

WordCamp 2008 in San Francisco videos should be out any time. Lots of WordCamp News including last weekend’s WordCamp South Africa and upcoming WordCamps in Portland, Hawaii, Birmingham, Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham, Utah, Philippines, and more. Jeffro asks you to stop blaming WordPress. Crazyhorse shakes the WordPress 2.7 trunk. How to switch from TypePad to WordPress with only a little stress. And more WordPress news.

WordPress News

Stop Blaming WordPress: In a daring post, Jeffro asks you to stop blaming the WordPress team for problems they have no control over, specifically, WordPress Plugins. I’ve written on this subject before and I agree. WordPress is an ongoing product in constant development and will undergo changes. For the most part, they are very good about announcing changes in code that will impact Plugins and Themes, and getting better all the time. If you support a WordPress Theme or Plugin, it’s your resonsibiilty to keep it updated. Thanks for reminding us, Jeffro.

Bleeding Edge Interface for WordPress 2.7: Ryan Boren announced that the new user interface from the Crazyhorse experimental version of WordPress 2.7 (we hope) is in the trunk. It is usable, but it will bite back, so only use it on your alfa testing blogs where it can do little harm.

Considering Switching from TypePad to WordPress: The never-ending battle between Lloyd Budd of and TypePad continues with his latest rant against TypePad, The TypePad Trap. Rant or not, this is a great article with tips you need to know about if you want to switch from TypePad to WordPress. read more

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Do You Ping?

One of the things people write about a lot in the blog world is “Pinging”. Apparently it should help you increase your traffic and/or backlinks.

Pinging is basically a notification to a website or service that you have updated the content on your blog. Most blog platforms do this automatically, but you can also add services or do it manually.

Problem is, while many people advocate it, I haven’t been able to find anyone who can prove it has the benefits people say it does … read more

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20 Free eBooks About Social Media

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Chris Brogan, always rooting out interesting material to further educate his readers, has assembled a list of 20 free eBooks about Social Media over at his blog.

Don’t forget to check out the comments where there are even more links to other free resources.

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Largest internet security hole revealed… or what is BGP?

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Wired has the story of the latest major security hole on the internet, the routing protocol BGP:

Two security researchers have demonstrated a new technique to stealthily intercept internet traffic on a scale previously presumed to be unavailable to anyone outside of intelligence agencies like the National Security Agency.

The tactic exploits the internet routing protocol BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) to let an attacker surreptitiously monitor unencrypted internet traffic anywhere in the world, and even modify it before it reaches its destination.

The demonstration is only the latest attack to highlight fundamental security weaknesses in some of the internet’s core protocols. Those protocols were largely developed in the 1970s with the assumption that every node on the then-nascent network would be trustworthy. The world was reminded of the quaintness of that assumption in July, when researcher Dan Kaminsky disclosed a serious vulnerability in the DNS system. Experts say the new demonstration targets a potentially larger weakness.

read more

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