BlogVault For WordPress: A Cheaper Better Backup Solution?

Filed as Reviews on August 31, 2010 10:55 pm

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After reviewing VaultPress by Automattic (the creators of WordPress), there has been a lot of spirited debate online (and off) over how much one should pay to backup their WordPress blog.

Although cheaper alternatives are available, very few match the backup frequency of VaultPress, save one which is blogVault.

Created by Inactiv Media Solutions, blogVault offers users an inexpensive hassle free way to back up their blog without breaking the bank.

With prices starting at $29/year, blogVault looks like a strong contender to many of the premium backup services available to WordPress.

BlogVault also does not require users to create an account with Amazon first, which means bloggers can focus on blogging rather than maintaining separate billing accounts.

For those of you who might consider blogVault as a “poor man’s VaultPress,” here is an in depth view from someone who is using both services.

Where blogVault Wins

Although blogVault does not backup your blog instantly like VaultPress, you can have the service conduct hourly backups of your site, as well as daily or even weekly (for those of you concerned about server spikes).

You can also select which files you want blogVault to backup, which might appeal to users interested in only protecting select portions of their blog.

BlogVault also has an automatic restore feature for you to test the site out, which is a feature that VaultPress has yet to implement on their site (although  the latter is planning on releasing this feature in the future).

As far as pricing goes, blogVault is overall much more affordable, with costs ranging from $29/year (for one blog with 1 GB of storage) to $249/year (for 15 blogs with 15 GB’s of storage).

Users can even demo test the service out freely for the first month (although blogVault will only backup to 50mb of your site).

Where VaultPress Wins

Although VaultPress’s smaller rival does provide hourly backups, it unfortunately is no match for Automattic’s live backup service which instantly backs up your blog as soon as you make any changes.

VaultPress also doesn’t rely solely upon Amazon’s S3 servers in order to back up your site, as they also utilizes their own WordPress servers (spread out across the United States) as well as a secret location (which this author refers to as “Space Mountain”).

Automattic also does not have cap limits on how much you can backup, so whether your blog is 100 mb or 100 GB’s, they will back up your site for the same “all you can eat” price.

Even better, the price does not increase over time, which means that in the future you can pay the same rate without having to worry about whether you should outsource your images, videos or audio files.

Last but not least VaultPress has a security feature which means that you can receive the same (if not similar) protection for your WordPress blog as the folks who receive WordPress VIP hosting.

Which Is Better?

If you have a personal blog and do not update your site frequently, then blogVault is probably the better option for you.

However if you use a blog for professional reasons (either as a business or for a charity), then you should choose VaultPress as an option (especially if your site is prone to hacking).

Currently I have VaultPress backing up two of my blogs (one personal, another professional), and blogVault protecting a third site.

While the former is definitely much more expensive, I have yet to find any company matching VaultPress features across any blogging platform (so it looks like I’ll be sporting WP for awhile).

Although I would encourage readers to take a hard look at VaultPress, if the service is beyond your budget you should consider blogVault as an alternative (unless you’re a super geek and prefer to do it yourself).

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  1. By Matt posted on September 1, 2010 at 1:36 am
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    They spammed a ton of people on Twitter when VaultPress launched, and do so lightly now. It was to the point I actually sent their account to @spam.

    Reply

    • By Darnell Clayton posted on September 1, 2010 at 2:30 am
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      I first came across them when users started asking about blogVault on Twitter (it took me a few hours to track the developer on Twitter. Perhaps he was quiet when I came on?).

      I then signed up one of my blogs and was surprised they offered hourly backups.

      Discounting the site restore it’s not as advanced as VaultPress. However IMHO it’s the best alternative for users until VaultPress exits beta. ;-)

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  2. By Catherine Scholz posted on September 1, 2010 at 4:20 pm
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    Thanks for this post, Darnell!

    I’ve been using Amazon Cloudfront to speed up site load times and store files.

    Here’s an article I wrote about it:
    http://www.catswebweave.com/load-wordpress-fast-with-dreamhost-amazon-cloudfront-and-w3total-cache-plugin/

    -WebWeaver

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