Using Twitter for Business

Last week, Chris Brogan wrote a post outlining fifty business ideas on using Twitter for business. Some of his ideas included:

  • Twitter breaks news faster than other sources, often (especially if the news impacts online denizens).
  • Twitter gives businesses a glimpse at what status messaging can do for an organization. Remember presence in the 1990s?
  • Twitter brings great minds together, and gives you daily opportunities to learn (if you look for it, and/or if you follow the right folks).

Valeria Maltoni weighs in with some great ideas on how to use Twitter for business over at Conversation Agent. One great idea is:

Try new ideas in a space where you will likely receive feedback.

The concept of being in beta is great to test whether there would be resistance to offerings and why. Although the number of Twitter users is relatively small, it is a much bigger crowd than just the one customer who bought something custom from you and thought it was a good product. Before you go ahead and make that a product, find more than one way to test its marketability.

Both posts have great ideas on what to consider and how to implement twitter in your business.

FriendFeed previews beta version of new design

FriendFeed, the highly popular social discussion site used by many (including me!), is previewing a beta version of their new site design over at the FriendFeed blog.

The design will feature several new features, such as Friend Lists:

Friend lists enable you to organize your friends into groups. With friend lists, you can get updates from your family separately from your coworkers, or you can add an acquaintance to a list and remove them from your home feed.

Another new feature is seeing a feed of your friend along with all of their subscriptions:

You can now see a feed of a person and all of their subscriptions. This new feature is a great way to show your uninitiated friends what your FriendFeed experience is like, and it is a great way to find interesting people you haven’t subscribed to yet.

All of the new beta features, layout, and design can be seen at

DNC is the most covered media event in Democrat’s history — by bloggers!

Wired covers the fact that the 2008 Democratic National Convention is the most covered media event in their party’s history – by bloggers!:

This year’s convention sees multiple firsts in technological innovations for the quadrennial political party gathering. For starters, the Democratic National Convention Committee is providing bloggers (and floor delegates) with “video-upload booths” where they can upload their footage to YouTube or any other online-video platform.

The DNC is using text messaging and streaming video to keep delegates (and those following along at home) up to date.

Their story also contains great hi-rez photos of the DNC setup along with discussions of other technologies and support that are in place for bloggers covering the convention.

Amazon buys book sharing startup Shelfari

Amazon has purchased book sharing startup Shelfari according to posts by Read/Write Web and TechCrunch last night.

The startup, which has one of the most interesting & funky user interfaces I’ve ever seen, is essentially a social networking & book sharing system for those that love to read.. like me!

Shelfari’s team makes the formal announcement on their blog:

We’ve got some big plans ahead. With more resources and Amazon’s expertise in building a platform where people come to share ideas, there are a lot of new opportunities in the future that will benefit each of you. In the meantime, you’ll continue to have access to the great community and tools that you’ve always known and used on the site.

Several years later, the Washington Posts notices that blogs are being used for Marketing

I’d say that the Washington Post has been living under a rock, since they are just now writing about how marketing is moving to the blogosphere in an article for today’s edition:

Bethesda’s Honest Tea launched its blog in late 2005 as a way to get close to customers. With a name like Honest Tea, chief executive Seth Goldman said, “we’re trying to be as open and disclose as much information as we can.” When the company announced that Coca-Cola would acquire a 40 percent interest in the brand, many of Honest Tea’s customers who opposed the agreement took their complaints to the blog.

“We gave a very loud voice to the people who said they weren’t happy about this decision,” Goldman said.

Goldman then took one of the most thoughtful, detailed customer criticisms and responded to each point. Even if readers still didn’t agree, “The blog at least helps people see how we think about it,” Goldman said.

All that said, many companies are just now beginning to utilize the power of the internet through blogs in order to have a real dialogue – or conversation – with their customers. [Read more…]

Which Facebook application developer is making more than $1m monthly?

At Allfacebook, Nick O’Neill claims that at least one Facebook application developer is making more than $1m/month, but won’t say who it is:

There’s a pretty well known secret among top Facebook application developers: one developer is generating over $1 million a month. Who is that developer exactly? Well, most people won’t talk about it and after some prodding around we’ve narrowed down the suspects. We aren’t going to post them though because ultimately it doesn’t matter who the individual is. All that matters is that a top application that is used for entertainment purposes is generating over $1 million a month.

So who is it? [Read more…]

Bone Marrow blogger dies after battle with Leukaemia

Blogger Adrian Sudbury, who blogged publicly about his ongoing battle with leukaemia, has died at the age of 27, the Telegraph reported this weekend:

He began by documenting his experiences on his blog and collected thousands of signatures in an online petition calling on schools and colleges to teach students about the value of donation.

Mr Sudbury, from Sheffield, became ill in November 2006 and was subsequently diagnosed with two distinct types of leukaemia.

The young journalist received a bone marrow transplant and although not successful it bought him valuable time with friends and family.

You can see Adrian’s Blog at RIP, Adrian.

Paul Stamatiou on living the cloud life

Paul Stamatiou has written a great post on ‘How to Live the Cloud Life’.

Paul outlines how to use cloud computing for several different things – ranging from E-mail (gmail), to storage (Amazon S3), to documents (Google Docs), and others.

As Paul writes in his intro:

There’s no doubt about it, I’m in love with the cloud. Some people might not share my fascination with storage-in-the-cloud and compute-in-the-cloud models but I can’t wait to have the same computing experience regardless of the computer or device I’m using to connect to the Internet. I’ve taken it upon myself to change my workflow and digital lifestyle to get as much of my data online and make use of web-based tools until that utopian time comes. Here’s how I do it and you can do the same.

Well worth the read…

Will 2008 be the year of the political blogger?

With a US Presidential Election this fall, along with 1/3rd of the Senate up for re-election, and the entire House of Representatives, could 2008 truly be the year of the political blogger?

The New York Times certainly thinks so:

Beginning Monday, hundreds of bloggers will descend on Denver to see Barack Obama accept his party’s nomination. Next week, hundreds more will travel to St. Paul to witness John McCain’s acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention. But now these online partisans, many of whom are self-financed, must contend with all the logistical and financial hurdles just to get there — not to mention the party politics happening behind the scenes.

This year, both parties understand the need to have greater numbers of bloggers attend. While many Americans may watch only prime-time television broadcasts of the convention speeches, party officials also recognize the ability of bloggers to deliver minute-by-minute coverage of each day’s events to a niche online audience.

To put this into perspective, the 2004 DNC in Boston credentialed only around twelve bloggers. This year, hundreds of bloggers have been credentialed at both convention. The micro-coverage from the smaller blogs and in-depth coverage provided by the larger blogs is going to elevate the artform of political blogging to a whole new level.

I can’t wait to watch..