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March 31, 2013

Anonymous To Spam Facebook With ‘Uncensored’ Posts On April 6

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Anonymous attacking Facebook April 6Hacktivist collective Anonymous will spam Facebook on April 6, 2013. The collective has promise to target the world’s largest social network with “uncensored material” that will clog up Facebook news feeds.

The fragmented groups known as Anonymous have attempted on various occasions to bring down social networks with no success, that of course does not mean they will stop now.

Anonymous is calling the campaign #OpTruthForce.

According to AnonNews:

“In past years we have seen a growing force around the world. Governments and corporations are working strategically to stop free speech by the people. In more recent months we have witnessed an increased number of account blocking and deletion by Facebook, of users who dare to ridicule, mock, satirize, or speak out against political leaders or corporations heavily involved with politics.” read more

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November 5, 2012

Anonymous Might Attack Facebook Today, Plans To Protest Zynga Layoffs

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Anonymous going after FacebookHacktivist group Anonymous is rumored to be preparing for a Monday attack on social network Facebook. The groups attack will coincide with Guy Fawkes Day and is meant to hurt the network over its support for social gaming platform Zynga.

Zynga recently began laying off more than 1,000 workers in an effort to cut down on mounting losses. While not directly involved in Zynga’s business transactions Facebook does derive a good but decreasing chunk of its revenues from Zynga games.

According to Anonymous the social gaming platform should be using its considerable cash reserves to pay employees during tough times. read more

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July 22, 2011

The Difference Between Law & Ethics in Blogging

Dogs on Leash LawSocieties generally have two ways that they try to encourage “positive” or “good” behavior on its members, laws and ethics.

But while both are similar in that they are ways to punish or discourage unwanted behavior, they are radically different in both what they are and how they operate.

As a blogger, you find yourself operating in a variety of societies. This includes traditional ones such as your local community, your country and the world as a whole as well as digital ones such as the blogging community and the Internet community.

This has some fairly profound implications for the laws and ethics you have to wrangle with as you’re not only caught between the duality of the two elements themselves, but in the layers of often conflicting standards of all the societies you reach and are a part of.

To unravel this mess, we have to first take a look at the differences between law and ethics and understand how they each impact bloggers in slightly different, but very powerful, ways. read more

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July 1, 2011

The Problems with Anonymous Blogging

Whenever I talk with others about the legal risks that come with blogging, it is inevitable that someone says that the risks don’t apply to them as they blog anonymously and no one will ever know who they are.

The truth is that, while anonymous blogging may be great for certain purposes, it isn’t a bullet proof vest that lets you do dumb things legally without fear of reprisal. Even if you can bring together a perfectly anonymous site, you have to be flawless in your execution of it ensuring that every single interaction, no matter how small, is untraceable.

While anonymous or pseudonymous blogging might be good enough to fool your mother, your boss or your friends, it won’t be enough to fool law enforcement nor anyone with adequate motivation and resources to track you down.

Anonymous blogging may free you up to say things you otherwise couldn’t, but it doesn’t free you up to break the law. Basically, if you’re blogging under a different name, you should expect to be found out if you make it interesting enough for anyone to seek out your information.

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February 2, 2010

Having Multiple (Blogging) Personalities

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I’m a nice guy. I believe in peace, love and harmony. But I also want to be a successful blogger. It’s no secret that controversial posts that take an unabashed stance on a hot-button issue generate serious traffic. If we’re going to be completely honest, sometimes being a pr*ck, is the best thing you can do for your blog. Since nice guys finish last, here are two ideas on how you can blog out of character. read more

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August 21, 2009

Skank Blogger Plans To Sue Google After Judge Ordered Google To Reveal Blogger’s Identity

rosemary-portIn a story line which couldn’t have been created better by Oscar Wilde, Rosemary Port, the author behind the ‘Skanks in NYC’ blog announced that she plans to sue the Californian search engine.

Ms. Port’s identity was revealed after Court ordered Google to identify the anonymous blogger earlier this week, when Liskula Cohen, her ‘skank’ victim, filed a $3m claim yesterday. Port’s name was in the court papers. Although Cohen has already dropped her $3m defamation case, former promoter Port hired lawyer Sal Strazzullo, who told the New York Post they will pursue Google with all legal options, because…

I’m shocked that my right to privacy has been tampered with read more

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June 18, 2009

Anonymous Blogger? Think Again!

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The media can be a bloggers’ friend or foe. In the case of detective constable Richard Horton of Lancashire, England – it’s the latter.

The High Court has ruled that a national newspaper was entitled to reveal the real name of the one-time anonymous blogger. read more

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June 16, 2009

Anonymous blogging UK police officer identity to be revealed after Court order

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The identity of a blogging British police officer going by the pseudonym “Night Jack” has been discovered by The Times newspaper and is soon to be published, after attempts by his lawyers to get an injunction preventing the exposé failed.

In the High Court, Mr Justice Eady ruled that blogging was “essentially a public rather than a private activity” and as such it was in the public interest to reveal his identity.

Unlike The Daily Telegraph, whose revelations regarding MPs expenses were definitely in the public interest, all The Times is likely to achieve is the loss of an interesting and insightful blog. Well done. read more

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March 30, 2009

The Outing of a Blogger: The Fear of Being Found Out

blog anonymous mask over word bloggerIn “The Outing of a Blogger: Social Transparency or Violation?” and “The Outing of a Blogger: Is it Legal to Reveal a Blogger?” I’ve covered some of the issues around the outing of an Alaskan blogger by a local politician and the legality of such actions.

There have been a variety of blogger outings lately, some with positive outcomes. Fake Steve Jobs Blogger, Daniel Lyons, admitted that he was stunned that it took so long to be uncovered, enjoying the attention. For Lyons, his blatant lampooning of Steve Jobs turned into a career booster. Lyons expected to be found out. Most anonymous bloggers worry they will be.

One of the greatest things about blogging is the freedom and ability to have your say, no matter what it is. One of the greatest fears is being found out.

Many bloggers live in fear of being found out, some at the risk of their lives. Others fear that their right to express themselves without persecution, even of the social kind, will be taken away by exposure. For those who blog anonymously, the law is one issue, but the social stigma is a bigger one. read more

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March 29, 2009

The Outing of a Blogger: Is it Legal to Reveal a Blogger?

blog anonymous mask over word bloggerIn “The Outing of a Blogger: Social Transparency or Violation?” I started this short series on the outing of a popular Alaska personal blogger, Mudflats (aka AKMuckraker or AKM), unveiled by a state politician.

The question I want to tackle in this article is the issue of the legality of blogger anonymity and what protects bloggers and not. This is a huge topic, so I’m only going to scratch the surface.

In many countries, there are no laws protecting freedom of speech nor journalists or bloggers. There may be protections for journalists, but none for bloggers. In countries where you would expect there to be such laws…it’s amazing how few there are and how flexible those laws can be.

Does a blogger have the right to privacy and anonymity? What rights do others have to expose them and why? read more

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