Gnip Adding Instagram, Reddit, Bitly And Panaramio To Its Data Pipeline


GnipGnip has added Instagram, Reddit, Bitly And Panaramio to its firehose of data licenses. The company was previously collecting data from  Twitter, Tumblr, WordPress and Disqus. Data collected by the company was then sold to brands so they could better understand how their products are being discussed on social media.

Gnip will now use public posts from its new services along with their APIs to fold further data into its subscription based reports.

In a blog post Gnip notes:

“Our customers care about every public conversation that happens online.”

Using the new platform marketers will be able to monitor Instagram posts by keyword or by geolocation. With Bitly and Reddit brands will be able to track links that are being shared about their products.  [Read more…] and YFrog team up. What does this mean for Twitpic?


bitlylogo2.pngURL Shortening service announced new partnerships with Google (Reader) and Typepad together with a new API yesterday.
Most interesting news though was the future integration of ‘upload-images-to-twitter’ service yfrog, the ImageShack service.

As for the upcoming features that we’re working on… we’re pleased to announce that one is them is a new way to use In partnership with yfrog, we’ll be rolling out a shortcut to let you upload and share photos from the homepage. links will also be available for all yfrog images.

After Twitter’s decision to integrate as standard URL sthortener and now the Google (Reader) collaboration it seems that has won the ‘Battle of the URL Shorteners’ for good. The question to ask now is: where does this leave Twitpic, the first ‘image-to-Twitter’ service and still leader in the race.

Which URL Shortener Should You Rely On?

Picking the right URL shortener for your links is obviously important, especially now that the fact that they might not be around for as long as you might like has dawned on people. Naturally you should roll your own, but failing that, it might be interesting to know that and are the most reliable ones. At least according to a reliability report from Pingdom. I must say, I was a bit surprised to see up on top, it has had some downtime in the past but have obviously got its act together. In fact, it was the only one with 100% uptime.

Be sure to read the whole thing. It is pretty interesting after all.

Death of URL Shortener Reveals Weakness

trim.pngURL shortener is throwing in the towel, and sends some blame to Twitter since they prefer competitor Fair enough, I’d say, and some players in the URL shortening field is bound to fall off in the coming months. Nambu’s just happen to be vocal about it in a blog post.

And finally, Twitter has all but sapped us of any last energy to double-down and develop further. What is the point? With the Twitter default, and with us having no inside connection to Twitter, will lose over the the long-run no matter how good it may or may not be at this moment, or in the future.

[Read more…]

Beware of Those Shortened URLs


The rise of Twitter and the 140 character cap it brings (which in turn comes from texting, but that’s a different story) has forced URL shortening upon us. Let’s face it, most URLs won’t leave much room for actual content in a tweet, and that’s why we use services like TinyURL and However, they offer risks as well, since someone can claim that an URL is for a certain thing, while it in fact is something completely different. If you’re lucky, it is just a hidden affiliate ad, but you might just as well end up at a site containing malicious code. [Read more…]

TinyURL’s Out,’s In

Twitter has been using TinyURL for its own URL shortening needs. Up until now, that is. As several sites have noticed, Twitter has silently replaced TinyURL with TechCrunch doesn’t find that very surprising, naming Betaworks as common ground for both and now Twitter-owned Summize.

Will Twitter buy next? They should, the fact that they’ve been relying on external infrastructure for their URL shortening needs this long is surprising.