You are currently browsing the tag archive for content generation

April 10, 2014

5 Things to Do Before Launching Your Site

Anyone can build and launch a web site these days, what with all the tutorials and tools available for free (and for a price, for those who are willing to pay). Of course, you can always pay someone to do the job for you, but if you’re going into blogging anyway, why not learn everything you can and do things yourself?

launching your site

Image source

If you’re planning on launching your site, you probably have already done your research; but we’re here to give you a little more help just to make sure that you get things right. Here are five things to do before launching your site.

read more

Tags: , ,

October 17, 2013

The SEO of Tolstoy: A Guide to Effective Content Strategy

Filed as Guides with 4 comments

The SEO of Tolstoy: A Guide to Effective Content Strategy (via Wallaroo Media)

The SEO of Tolstoy: A Guide to Effective Content Strategy In order to run an effective content strategy for yourself or a client, you need to keep in mind that your audience requires specific, useful information in order to make an informed decision…


read more

Tags: ,

October 10, 2013

How to Use Quora to Cook Up Great Content

Filed as Guides with 1 comment

quora

The most successful blogs offer useful content often, as it keeps readers coming back and helps with search rankings. But with the pressure to constantly come up with new ideas, it’s normal for bloggers to experience “blogger’s block” and become a bit overwhelmed with it all. Fortunately there are sites like Quora that can help you generate new ideas by discovering what people are asking about — and searching for — already. read more

Tags: , ,

July 11, 2013

How Google Glass Can Benefit Content Creators with Sarah Hill

Google Glass

On June 28, 2011, a new social network by the name of Google+ emerged. One feature called Hangouts made it stand out from the rest. For free and without any additional software, you can start or join a group video chat with up to 10 people. Later, the ability to stream live and record Hangouts was added. One person early to use them was Sarah Hill, a 12-time Emmy award winning anchor for KOMU-TV based out of Missouri.

Hangouts enabled her to offer a different perspective of the news room, allowing Google+ users from around the world to see what goes on behind the scenes. Eventually, Sarah moved on to work with the Veterans United Network where she tells stories about veterans, and military families. Recently, Sarah got her hands on Google Glass which is leading the charge in the next generation of wearable computing. In this interview, we talk about how Glass can benefit content creators, the future of content creation, and more.

How did you get involved with being one of the first recipients of Google Glass?

I volunteer for a project called “Veterans Virtual Tours”. We provide online tours to aging and terminally veterans who would like to see their memorial but are too sick to travel. I saw the Google+ post about Glass and decided to share my #ifIhadglass wish. read more

Tags: , , ,

July 15, 2008

Blogging Jobs: How Much Are Bloggers Paid to Blog?

Blogging Jobs by Lorelle VanFossenAs we continue with this series on blogging jobs, it’s time to look at the income a blogger can make by blogging for pay.

The skills and qualities a company or blog owner is looking for from a blogger are extensive, far beyond just writing abilities. As with any freelance job, determining how to put a value on the time it really takes, and the costs associated with the time and production, is really hard when the real cost is in time, not materials. Bloggers should be paid for the time as well as their expertise and abilities. Are they? This is a problem that has been around for a very long time. How much is your time worth?

For many decades, professional editorial writers found a compromise on the time/value issue with payment by the word with a restriction on word count. I often was told, “We’ll pay you a dollar a word up to 1,000 words maximum.”

This meant the magazine, newspaper, newsletter, or other print publication had space for one thousand words that needed to be filled. Going over meant changing their magazine or newspaper design structure. Giving them less meant I’d be paid less, but somewhere in the middle was a compromise for both of us, usually in the form of me setting a minimum fee I was to be paid, no matter the word count, such as “I want $500 minimum for 700 words and a dollar a word thereafter.” If the article came it at 400 words, I would still be paid my minimum. If it crossed the 700 word mark, at which point I should have been paid $700 for a dollar a word, that’s when they have to start paying me the dollar a word rate. It wasn’t the best, but the companies felt like they were getting a deal and for the most part, I covered the minimum I needed to pay my rent and eat.

Here is a chart for the various traditional writer’s pay scale based upon a dollar amount per word. The more experience and expertise, the higher the fee per word.
read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,