Blogging in the Middle East: How Hazardous is it?

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Over the past several months is seems we have been hit with several horror stories coming out of the Middle East related to blogging. As more of the region has gained access to the internet, this has led to an influx of new people using this capability to express their opinions online in the form of a blog. Unfortunately, this has also led to more publicity for these people, and introduces them to people who disagree with their opinion. This has resulted in violent acts against these bloggers, sometimes even death. With the major news outlets picking up these stories, it can come across as the Middle East being very dangerous for bloggers. So we are here to try and answer the question, just how hazardous is it?

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Politicians Paying Bloggers For Positive Press?

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After the pay per post and pay per tweet fiasco’s that previously upset the blogosphere (mainly due to the lack of disclosure), it looks like blog readers may have to deal with a new scandal, one that could damage the reputation of conservative political bloggers.

“It’s standard operating procedure” to pay bloggers for favorable coverage, says one Republican campaign operative. A GOP blogger-for-hire estimates that “at least half the bloggers that are out there” on the Republican side “are getting remuneration in some way beyond ad sales.” […]

One pro-Poizner blogger, Aaron Park, was discovered to be a paid consultant to the Poizner campaign while writing for Red County, a conservative blog about California politics. Red County founder Chip Hanlon threw Park off the site upon discovering his affiliation, which had not been disclosed. (Daily Caller) [Read more…]

DNC is the most covered media event in Democrat’s history — by bloggers!

Wired covers the fact that the 2008 Democratic National Convention is the most covered media event in their party’s history – by bloggers!:

This year’s convention sees multiple firsts in technological innovations for the quadrennial political party gathering. For starters, the Democratic National Convention Committee is providing bloggers (and floor delegates) with “video-upload booths” where they can upload their footage to YouTube or any other online-video platform.

The DNC is using text messaging and streaming video to keep delegates (and those following along at home) up to date.

Their story also contains great hi-rez photos of the DNC setup along with discussions of other technologies and support that are in place for bloggers covering the convention.