Michael Arrington Takes a Break After Death Threat and Spit Attack

There’s no doubt that being successful can annoy people, and TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington has gotten a fair share of haters out there. I doubt he didn’t expect that, he’s pretty straight-forward in his posts over at TechCrunch, and I can see people being annoyed by this guy. I can even see them being pissed off.

But walking up and spitting him in the face? I can’t see what Arrington might’ve done to deserve that.

Nor does he deserve to have serious death threats and having to hide out at his parents’ house. That is so totally wrong, and I sincerely hope and believe that you all agree with me. You don’t have to be an Arrington fan to be upset with the development of things detailed in a recent TechCrunch post on the subject. It is a matter of free speech, people!

While I think Arrington probably needs that vacation breather far away from iPhones and Macbooks for several reasons, I also hope that this isn’t a sign of things to come. You can’t bully print journalists, you can’t bully bloggers, and most importantly: We can’t accept it!

TechCrunch Passes 10,000 Posts, Celebrates by Killing the Embargo

Techcrunch LogoTechCrunch has announced that they’ve passed the 10,000 post mark, which is impressive to say the least. The tech blog launched in June 2005 and has become a phenomenon since then, loved, hated, ignored, and important to the web 2.0 startup industry, if you can call it that.

They’re saying that the Death to the Embargo post was the 10,000th one, and naturally the controversy hit TechMeme, with lots of follow-ups. ReadWriteWeb takes another stance, saying they’ll respect embargoes, which Arrington & Co. obviously won’t anymore. Personally, I think embargoes are a good thing when used right. Problem is, usually it is just a press release you can’t write about until a few days time, and that’s just nonsense. It is a whole different matter if you’ve got early access or similar. An interesting discussion to say the least, one we’ll pass for now.

Anyway, congratulations to TechCrunch on writing a whole lotta posts!

Online Giants’ Ad Growth Halts

TechCrunch mashed together the online advertising revenues of the big 4, being Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and AOL, for the third quarter. The result? Just 0.6% growth, which is still some $50 million increase, but pale in comparison. Read Erick Schonfeld’s post for graphs and more. Also, don’t miss the blog networks roundtable for some more bloggish thoughts on the current financial situation.

Engadget Scored 14 Million Pageviews on the Apple Notebook Event

The Apple Tuesday notebook event, where new MacBooks were announced, and drove traffic to a lot of gadget focused sites and blogs. One of those are Engadget, which got a mammoth 14 million pageviews on that particluar day, according to a leaked internal mail reposted by TechCrunch. They reported 1.3 million uniques, so that’s almost 11 pageviews per person. That’s a record for the site.

Weblogs Inc. as a whole served 23.9 million pageviews, and 3.4 million uniques, another all-time high according to the internal email.

How To Get In Touch with Michael Arrington: Sue TechCrunch

Earthcomber is suing TechCrunch, along with Loopt, for pretty dubious reasons. I’ll let Michael Arrington speak for himself, from his post:

I called Earthcomber President Jim Brady this morning to verify the lawsuit. At first he wouldn’t answer – all he did was try to explain how he’s been wronged by Loopt. When pressed he did confirm that the lawsuit was filed, but quickly added that he didn’t really mean to press it with us. He wants to go to court with Loopt, but is willing to quickly work something out with us to make this go away, he told me, hinting that he’d like to partner with us. He also said he’s been desperately trying to get me on the phone but hasn’t been able to, so he decided to sue us instead.

You know, this sounds like a really bad idea to me, and I certainly don’t think that taking legal actions against someone is a good way to connect. At least not if you’re looking for a partnership. And obviously that won’t happen with Earthcomber and TechCrunch either: [Read more…]

Huffington Posts New Technorati Top 100 Leader

Arianna Huffington’s The Huffington Post is the new #1 spot on Technorati Top 100 blogs list, overtaking previous frontrunner Michael Arrington’s TechCrunch. I’m not sure if this really means anything, but TechCrunch have been controlling the Technorati Top 100 list for some time now. Other than that, here’s the top 10:

  1. The Huffington Post
  2. TechCrunch
  3. Gizmodo
  4. Engadget
  5. Boing Boing
  6. Lifehacker
  7. Ars Technica
  8. Official Google Blog
  9. Daily Kos
  10. TravelPod

Do you care about the Technorati Top 100 list at all?

B5media Revamps Pay Model, Bloggers Lose Money

Blog network b5media is revamping their pay scheme, and that means a lot less money for the bloggers. More or less every blog within the network will see a drop in revenue because of this. TechCrunch broke the story by posting a memo from CEO Jeremy Wright, in which the following is key:

I’m sure by now you’ve run your blog through the system above and realized that (with a handful of exceptions), due to the change to Omniture as a stats package, your pay will go down. For some it will go down significantly. Obviously this isn’t the intent of the new pay system, it was just the flaw in the previous stats package. For the last two years, b5 has been effectively paying bloggers 2-3x more in traffic bonuses than they were actually getting. While, again, this isn’t a blogger’s fault, neither is the new pay system about “cutting pay”. Any reduction in pay is due almost exclusively to the reality of using an inaccurate pay system in the past vs an industry standard third-party audited system going forward.

Jeremy Wright has tried to respond to the post, but his comments are apparently getting caught in moderation, so he posted it on his blog for now. He points out the obvious culprit: [Read more…]

Aggregator Feeds Us TechCrunch50 Stories

Is this the future? The TechCrunch50 Aggregator feeds us stories from the blogosphere and the social web that are tagged “techcrunch50” or “tc50”, which is really cool. Sure, it is mostly tweets up front, but you can sort it. Perhaps this is the future, a mashed up feed of specific events. Sean Percival built the service, and naturally it hit TechCrunch as well.

Scribd launches a redesign

Scribd, a popular document sharing service, has launched a redesign. TechCrunch takes a look:

One of the major changes in the design is a new emphasis on search. Scribd has seen impressive growth since its launch in Spring 2007, and now claims more than 20 million unique visitors monthly. But more than half of that traffic comes from search engines – something that the site would like to change. The new design is intended to make the search function more prominent, encouraging users to turn to Scribd instead of Google or Yahoo when they’d like to find a document. And CEO Trip Adler says that it’s working: while A/B bucket testing the new design, Scribd has seen the number of searches double (the number of uploads increased by 70% as well).

Scribd is a great service for incorporating complex documents into blogs via their widget for posts and other functions.

TechCrunch Forgets Green; Goes White Instead

It’s not every day that a blog that writes about blogs gets written up on a blog writing about blogs. Such is the case right here, right now, when it comes to the TechCrunch redesign.

The gang over TC, who obsessively profile and review new Internet products and companies, have cleaned up their image with a new look. As with most redesigns, the spin is to improve navigation and increase ‘readability.’ However, only a fool would look past the real reason: to sell advertising. And you can’t really fault a business (yes, it’s a blog – but it’s big business) for optimizing ad space.

I’m undecided on the new design. Quite honestly, I need to give myself a few days to adapt before I can share my thoughts. My initial reaction is that it’s almost TOO ‘clean.’ I understand the power of white space, but the site’s header is so bare, that a new reader might have no clue what a tremendous force TC is.

Google and Apple have made white en vogue, but I’m not sold. There’s a fine line between ‘clean and simple’ and just looking like you were too lazy to hire a talented designer.

I’m on the fence with the new TechCrunch look. What do you think?