Remainders: 10/22/06

Filed as Uncategorized on October 22, 2006 5:03 pm

Future Space covers a wired article outlining how an investigation has revealed more than 744 sex offenders with Myspace profiles.

Paul Colligan takes a look at the economics of videoblogging in response to Scoble’s post on the same issue.

Business Week outlines that we knew would happen – a look at how internet gambling is moving underground. It’s the internet, you idiots, you won’t be able to regulate it.

The Washington Post writes about click fraud online…. again.

Michael Arrington confirms that Google didn’t buy SpaceShipOne – which should have been obvious, because it’s hanging in the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

And now that I’ve seen it in person, Salvador Dali’s The Persistance of Memory remains one of my favorite pieces of art.

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  1. By Richard Ball posted on October 23, 2006 at 2:15 pm
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    Regarding the click fraud article, it’s another case of a sensational headline but an article with no new news. Articles like this one (and the BusinessWeek click fraud article) fail to mention that advertisers can choose to opt out of contextual advertising. This Washington Post article does at least point out that this is where the bulk of click fraud occurs. The real story is that both Google and Yahoo force advertisers into choosing to run contextual ads as well as search engine ads. Yes, advertisers can opt out, but I wonder how many really do? If advertisers had to opt in to content networks, would click fraud even be an issue?