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September 30, 2009

Street Named After Twitter Account

There is a street named “@arjanelfassed”, after the Twitter account with the same name. Isn’t that amazing? Well yes, it is, but it’s not as big as it sounds. There is a Dutch website that sells street names in a Palestinian refugee camp, giving the proceeds to the Palestinian Child Care Society. Wired’s Epicenter have the full story, with quotes and details. So while it is not as big as having a street named after your Twitter account in central New York, it is for a good cause.

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June 24, 2009

Chris Anderson’s Free! Borrows From Wikipedia

Wired editor Chris Anderson is soon to launch his latest book/theory, following up on The Long Tail, titled Free!. There’s definitely nothing wrong with his ideas if you ask me, and you can read them for yourself on Wired, but the book seems a bit, well rushed perhaps?

First there was the WordPress incident, where Anderson probably was making the famous wordpress.org/wordpress.com mixup. He should know better, and a technical reviewer should have caught that.

Now there’s copy-pasting from Wikipedia.

Fast Company found the Virginia Quarterly Review blog post detailing how Anderson copy-pasted an entry from the Free lunch entry on Wikipedia, and illustrates it with side by side comparisons. Just look at all that yellow text marking the similarities! read more

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June 22, 2009

Chris Anderson Doesn’t Get WordPress

I’m a big fan of Chris Anderson, the Wired editor and The Long Tail author. His most recent book is Free!, due anytime soon (for free in some versions, paid in others), and it is all about content online. I especially like his thoughts on freemium, free+premium that is, being what Flickr does with paid pro accounts that more or less makes the service free for non-paying users.

But he doesn’t get WordPress. At least not if this tip sent to WordPress developer Mark Jaquith is true. read more

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April 28, 2009

Wired Drops TypePad, Moves To WordPress

Now this is a huge feather in the already pretty feather-heavy WordPress hat: Wired switches from TypePad to WordPress.

We’ve switched content platforms to WordPress, which should allow for all kinds of widgety fun and games as we move our stuff into the new place and figure out where to hang things.

While at it, the Wired blogs have also gotten something of a facelift to “bring all the Wired blogs into closer sync with the main site, and with the magazine”, which sounds like a good idea.

Naturally, the WordPress Publisher Blog is reporting this, and so is Automattican Matt Mullenweg and Toni Schneider. Six Apart owns the TypePad service, and I bet they are a bit pissed that Wired didn’t go for Movable Type instead.

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April 15, 2009

Clive Thompson Thinks The White House Is Ready For Trolls

Whitehouse.gov isn’t the open discussion website that (at least som) Barack Obama supporters from the election would have liked. I can understand why, politics is tricky business and if anyone could post a comment, it could (and would) get nasty really quick.

Enter Wired’s Clive Thompson and his post on how to tame trolls. It’s not news really, rather technologies and ways big sites manage it today, from stripping trolling commentaries of the vowels, to manual comment moderation. read more

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October 21, 2008

Valleywagger attempts to assassinate blogs; social networking and microblogging is where it’s at

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Paul Boutin — “Very Special Correspondent” at Valleywag — has written what I can only assume is linkbait over at WIRED Magazine. It’s working, anyway.

While I don’t disagree with some of his opening words, I do take issue with his black-and-white stance: that blogging is dead and microblogging (or whatever Boutin might call it, given that “blogging” itself is now a dirty word) is the way forward — linked in to social networks like Facebook.

“Thinking about launching your own blog? Here’s some friendly advice: Don’t. And if you’ve already got one, pull the plug.

Writing a weblog today isn’t the bright idea it was four years ago. The blogosphere, once a freshwater oasis of folksy self-expression and clever thought, has been flooded by a tsunami of paid bilge. Cut-rate journalists and underground marketing campaigns now drown out the authentic voices of amateur wordsmiths. It’s almost impossible to get noticed, except by hecklers. And why bother? The time it takes to craft sharp, witty blog prose is better spent expressing yourself on Flickr, Facebook, or Twitter.”

Clearly this is only one opinion of many, but because Boutin has been granted a very public soapbox at WIRED, he’s making the most of it. Others believe that blogging is a vital part of corporate branding, while Six Apart’s leader reckons blogging will ride the economic downturn. read more

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September 4, 2008

Wired blogs the creation of a Feature Story

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Wired is blogging the creation of a feature story from beginning to end.

It’s a fascinating look at how the process works from the very beginning – through storyboarding, the pitch, and the down and dirty logistics to actually making the feature happen.

The feature is about Charlie Kaufman and is scheduled in run in the November 2008 issue of Wired Magazine.

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August 27, 2008

Largest internet security hole revealed… or what is BGP?

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Wired has the story of the latest major security hole on the internet, the routing protocol BGP:

Two security researchers have demonstrated a new technique to stealthily intercept internet traffic on a scale previously presumed to be unavailable to anyone outside of intelligence agencies like the National Security Agency.

The tactic exploits the internet routing protocol BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) to let an attacker surreptitiously monitor unencrypted internet traffic anywhere in the world, and even modify it before it reaches its destination.

The demonstration is only the latest attack to highlight fundamental security weaknesses in some of the internet’s core protocols. Those protocols were largely developed in the 1970s with the assumption that every node on the then-nascent network would be trustworthy. The world was reminded of the quaintness of that assumption in July, when researcher Dan Kaminsky disclosed a serious vulnerability in the DNS system. Experts say the new demonstration targets a potentially larger weakness.

read more

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