Interview with Amanda Rose, Twestival Organizer

Twestival Logo

Earlier today, the Blog Herald interviewed Amanda Rose (Twitter: @amanda), founder and event organizer for Twestival (see earlier coverage), which gathers volunteer Twitter users everywhere this Thursday, February 12 to raise money and awareness for charity:water. Here you go.

How has Twitter helped the spread of the Twestival meme?

Twitter as a communications tool has enabled Twestival to happen.  This type of global, grassroots events series could never have happened even 2 years ago.  The immediacy of communication and the ability to tie communities together via Twitter has been crucial.  We are also using Twitter as the foundation of many of our fundraising efforts; Tipjoy.com is a great way for people to ‘tweet’ their donation and spread the word to others.

What was your strategy for using Twitter to promote Twestival going into the campaign?

My initial strategy was to use my already existing network of Twitter followers to see if they would be interested in hosting a Twestival.  I explained the vision and after a few days I knew that I had the support of a few key cities, so that when I pushed it out publicly with a tweet on January 8th, it would create some buzz and some excitement for people to be apart of it. I keep an eye on the Twitter search for Twestival and flag up any interest or divert communications to make sure I get a feeling of what is happening in the Twittersphere.

How has that strategy evolved as you’ve conducted the campaign?

The strategy has been pretty consistent.  We are working under very short timescales, with volunteers, so the time element has been difficult

What do you think motivates people to volunteer for events like this?

I believe that people want to do something good with the talents they have.  So if you ask them and set out parametres for their involvement, where they see what part they play in this global project, it doesn’t take a lot to motivate people.  I have not had trouble finding any lack of volunteers for requests; from building an online map of cities participating, to sourcing sponsorship for the Gumball Rally that turned around in 24hrs.

Can you share any inspiring examples of how Twestival is making a difference offline?

I think the most inspiring thing will be on Friday February 13th, when we all tune into Twitter to hear how many lives are going to be changed because of what was accomplished through Twestival globally.

Thanks again to Amanda Rose for allowing us some time to interview her as she helps the world prepare for the inaugural Twestival. After Amanda catches a few much-needed winks of sleep post-Twestival, we’ll try to catch up to her again for another interview.

Are you participating in Twestival? What would you like to see for Twestival 2010? Any questions for Amanda Rose, Twestival founder and organizer?

Comments

  1. says

    The amber and green are not really necessary, one red signal will do, this can pulse before going off, i.e. to the ‘green’, ‘go’ state. A fair amount of ‘leccy’ would be saved with the red-only system.

  2. says

    You can’t blame Ross for trying to make a specticle of gameday. So long as he understands and is fully committmed to putting a winning team on the field. This remains to be seen as one season surely will not give us ssenough of a track record to tell.

  3. says

    high-level API to transform sounds, but with some Actionscript you can do almost everything you can imagine. As a bonus we will be able to extract encoded MP3 audio data

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