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Google Collecting Minor’s Data?

Google Collecting Minor’s Data?

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Google Collecting Data

Adalytics, a data analytics firm, has now released research that suggests Google may have broken the law by advertising to minors and collecting data on them. This casts doubt on Google’s claims that they are taking measures to keep the internet safe for children. A 2019 settlement with the FTC over alleged breaches of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) has apparently not stopped Google-owned YouTube from serving tailored adverts and using ad trackers on video branded “made for kids,” as the article claims.

The Origins of the COPPA Law

Under the terms of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) of 1998, it is illegal for businesses to solicit or collect personal information from children under the age of 13. As part of a $170 million settlement in 2019, Google agreed to disable personalized advertisements and cease collecting data on youngsters. However, according to Adalytics, large brands like Verizon, Disney, and Hyundai are using Google’s targeting tools to place behavioral advertisements on children’s content.

Google’s Concerns and Reponse

According to Google, cookies have nothing to do with watching “made for kids” content, hence the company doesn’t let targeted adverts or third-party trackers on such material. Google says the cookies referenced in the research are encrypted and hence worthless to other parties. According to the research and Adalytics, it is difficult for advertisers to keep their adverts from showing up on material that is appropriate for children.

Demands for Openness

While Google defends its practices, privacy groups say they enable hidden data harvesting from youngsters. Google has been accused of not taking enough measures to ensure the safety of children’s data. By permitting adverts on children’s television, Google has disappointed some in the advertising industry. The study offers independent audits of YouTube’s algorithms and ad systems to better safeguard children, and it calls for greater openness and accountability from corporations putting advertising on children’s material.

Potential Consequences

Google’s compliance with the FTC agreement and the protection of children’s data is in doubt if the report’s assertions are accurate. This research confirms the need of stricter audits and governmental oversight. Conflicts with Google’s earlier deal to protect children’s data for commercial benefit. Despite Google’s assurances that it is committed to protecting children’s privacy online, the research suggests that more needs to be done in this area.

Conclusion

Google’s alleged collection of data on minors for the purpose of targeted advertising has sparked fresh questions about the company’s adherence to privacy regulations. According to Adalytics’ findings, children’s media is a prime target for targeted advertising and data collecting. Experts and privacy organizations have criticized Google for not doing more to safeguard children’s personal information. It remains to be seen how these claims would affect Google’s deal with the FTC. The protection of children’s personal information and online anonymity is a pressing concern as the debate continues.

See first source: Search Engine Journal

FAQ

1. What does the recent research from Adalytics suggest about Google’s actions?

Adalytics’ research raises concerns that Google may have violated the law by advertising to minors and collecting data on them. This challenges Google’s assertions about internet safety for children.

2. How does this research relate to Google-owned YouTube and tailored advertisements?

Despite a 2019 settlement over alleged breaches of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), Adalytics claims that YouTube still serves tailored ads and uses ad trackers on content labeled “made for kids.”

3. What is the basis of the COPPA law?

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) of 1998 makes it illegal for businesses to collect personal information from children under 13. Google’s settlement in 2019 involved disabling personalized ads and ending data collection on children.

4. Are major brands violating COPPA through their advertising practices?

According to Adalytics, major brands like Verizon, Disney, and Hyundai are using Google’s tools to place behavioral ads on children’s content, potentially violating COPPA.

5. How has Google responded to these claims?

Google maintains that cookies used in “made for kids” content are not connected to ads and trackers. Google asserts that the cookies mentioned in the research are encrypted and unusable by third parties.

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6. What concerns have privacy groups raised regarding Google’s practices?

Privacy groups argue that Google’s practices might facilitate covert data collection from minors. Critics accuse Google of insufficient measures to protect children’s data.

7. What recommendations does the research offer to address these concerns?

The research suggests independent audits of YouTube’s algorithms and ad systems for better child protection. It also calls for greater transparency and accountability from companies placing ads on children’s content.

8. What could be the implications of these claims for Google?

If the research’s claims are accurate, Google’s compliance with the FTC agreement and child data protection would be in doubt. Stricter audits and governmental oversight might be needed.

9. How does this impact Google’s previous agreement to protect children’s data?

The research highlights potential conflicts with Google’s earlier agreement to safeguard children’s data for commercial gain.

10. What’s the takeaway from this situation?

The alleged data collection on minors for targeted ads raises questions about Google’s adherence to privacy regulations. Privacy experts and organizations criticize Google for insufficient child data protection. As discussions unfold, protecting children’s personal information and online privacy remains a critical concern.

Featured Image Credit: zhenzhong liu; Unsplash РThank you!

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