Review 2.0 – This Is How You Do It

Filed as Guides on March 3, 2009 3:16 am

Review 2.0 - This Is How You Do ItMy hat’s off to Gina Trapani (whom I interviewed recently) for an excellent reviewish post about netbooks. Or mini-PCs or whatever we’re allowed to call them these days (Psion has a patent, claims to be using it). You know the type, the small cheap computers made popular with the Asus Eee PC and now available in a plethora of models from a whole bunch of manufacturers. I myself have had an Eee PC 900, and a Kohjinsha SH6 before that (still around actually), and the current one is a Lenovo S10e, which I just won’t let go.

I could write a review on these machines, these products. It would start with my initial thoughts on the design, I’d go through the hardware aspects, and then I’d ramble on, do some benchmarks perhaps, get a photo gallery up there… You know the deal, it’s been done a thousand times.

Or I could do a review 2.0.

Like Gina did, but she didn’t call it that so I call dibs on that one.

So what is it? Well, it’s part crowdsourcing and part graphs, with added background from the publisher. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Decide on a product to review.
  2. Ask for opinions about the product on social networks and microblogging sites.
  3. Take the opinions, try to throw out the trolls, and mark what’s good and what’s bad about the product in nice colors.
  4. Make a graph on the data, that adds credibility.
  5. Write your “review” post, and add a reasonable amount of the opinions gathered.

There you have it! A review 2.0.

I love it.

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  1. By Bryan posted on March 11, 2009 at 11:18 am
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    That’s a great review technique. I must have missed that article for some reason. I love the subtle user of red/green for negative/positive comments. That’s such a simple thing to do that a really narrows the reader in on the good/bad as well as making the article pop off the screen. Her post on Crowdsourcing five days later ties into the review really well.

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