Twittelator Pro: The iPhone App For Jedi Masters (On Twitter)

Filed as Guides on May 20, 2009 8:19 am

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As any twitter guru familiar in the ways of the tweet will tell you, not all Twitter apps are created equal.

While some Twitter apps come with fancy layouts or simple UI’s (such as Twitterific and Tweetie), very few premium apps match the power of Twittelator Pro (an app developed by Stone Design).

While fans may accuse me of being a Dark Lord for not embracing their favorite Twitter client (like Twitterfon), here are a few (okay five) reasons why Twittelator Pro may be worth spending money on against it’s premium rivals.

The All Knowing Friend Wheel

You do not not have to be Yoda to realize that remembering the exact screen name of a follower can be difficult—if not impossible—without the aid of some kind of “force.”

Instead of tweeting a friend or foe whenever they appear in your stream line, Twittelator Pro solves this with with the All Knowing Friend Wheel, which flows through your twitterverse, connecting you with all of your followers.

This feature is very helpful, especially on #followfridays, as it allows you to initiate a conversation with several individuals, without fear of mistype.

Since many tweeple (or people on Twitter) have hundreds, thousands or hundreds of thousands of followers, Twittelator Pro puts the last 20 people you tweeted on top, making it easier to respond (lest you have to scroll through eternity to find those you tweet most frequently).

Hashtag Lightening Strikes

Unless you are unfamiliar with the ways of the tweet, you are probably familiar with hashtags, which allow users not following you to easily connect with others discussing hot/popular topics.

While most twitter clients allow you to easily search a hashtag (like #followfriday or #charitytuesday) by simply tapping it, only Twittelator Pro provides a scroll wheel making it easier to insert them within the tweet, saving you both time and energy (at least for your poor thumbs).

Double Tweet Mind Trick

One of the great things about Twitter is the fact that messages are short and pithy. One of the bad things about Twitter is that messages are short and pithy.

In order to help prevent you from running up against the 140 character limit, a few Twitter apps (Twittelator Pro included) get around this by “shrinking” your message and replacing it with chat slang (example: won with 1, there with thr).

Since not everyone is comfortable with speaking chat slang (which sounds “wookish” if you ask me), Twittelator Pro allows users to divide their surplus tweet into two, sending them to your friend without fear of them missing part (or half) of your message.

Padawan Draft Mode

Sometimes when you tweet, you lack the the foreknowledge to express what to say. Instead of deleting your message and losing your original thoughts, Twittelator Pro allows you to save multiple drafts (yes, as in more than one folks!) for you to revisit later.

This one feature might appeal to those of you with iPod Touch’s, as it allows you to compose a tweet offline, and respond back to someone whenever you hit a Wifi spot.

Tweet Bar Sensitivity

When it comes to tweeting, most twitter clients presume to know which buttons their users will use based on surveys, feedback or analysis from the Twitter grand masters (which would be @ev, @jack and @biz).

Instead of presenting you with options written in carbonite, allows you to select which buttons will make the Tweet bar. Users can switch buttons from a variety of options, giving them greater flexibility over Twittelator Pro’s layout.

Conclusion

Twittelator Pro comes in two main flavors (the $5 premium app, as well as the free ware) which one can pick up at Apple’s walled garden (also known as the App Store).

Although twitter newbie’s may prefer a simple layout (via Tweetie), massive eye candy (via Twitteriffic) or just plain elegant (via Twitterfon), power users may want to consider switching to Twittelator Pro to help satisfy their tweeting thirst.

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